Plant-based protein powders contain arsenic, mercury, cadmium, lead and more

The Clean Label Project recently tested 134 of America’s best selling animal-derived and plant-based protein powders for heavy metals (arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury), over 100 pesticides, BPA/BPS (plasticizers that are known endocrine disruptors), residual solvents, mycotoxins, melamine and its analogues, and antibiotics residues.

These contaminants are the result of sourcing and production practices. Contaminants can be found in soils because of pesticides and mining run-off (ex. heavy metals) and can be absorbed by plants. They can also be the result of the manufacturing process (ex. BPA/BPS is used in the lining of cans and containers and leach into the protein powder).

The shocking results of the study is that many protein powders had significant levels of contaminants and overall, plant-based protein powders had higher levels of contaminants than those made from animal sources, containing on average twice as much lead and measurably higher amounts of other contaminants. Many animal-based protein powders scored poorly as well.

Two servings per day of protein powder could put you way above what is considered an “acceptable level” of contaminant exposure.

Plant-based protein powders may have higher contamination levels because plants are especially prone to absorbing heavy metals from soil, says Sean Callan, Ph.D., a neuroscientist and director of operations at Ellipse Analytics, the lab that tested the protein products.

Another surprise, organic protein powders had higher levels of heavy metals, on average, than non-organic.

Organic powders had up to 1.5X more arsenic, up to 4.8X more cadmium and up to 1.5X more lead.

According to Callan, “That probably has more to do with these products being plant-based than being organic.”

After evaluating the raw data, the protein powders were scored with 1 to 5 stars based on their level of contaminants in one serving. 3 stars was considered to be average, 5 stars is above average in overall purity. 1 star is below average.

The results…

The Bottom Five of the 134 protein powders tested contained the highest amount of industrial or environmental contaminants and two of them were popular plant-based protein powders:

Garden of Life Organic Raw Meal Chocolate Cacao and Vega Sport Plant-Based Vanilla Performance Protein.

Garden of Life is now owned by processed-food mega giant Nestle (booo!) and most of their Raw Protein and Raw Meal flavors tested scored 1-2 stars for purity, except for their Raw Organic Vanilla Protein, which got 4 out of 5 stars for purity.

Sunwarrior Warrior Blend Vanilla got 3 stars for purity. Their Chocolate and Natural flavors got 2 stars.

The majority of 11 Vega protein powders tested scored 1 star for purity. A few got 2 stars.

Nutiva’s Nurture Vitality High Fiber Superfood and Hemp Protein 15G both scored 1 star for purity.

Purely Inspired Vanilla Organic Protein got 1 star for purity.

Results of the other plant-based protein powders tested:

Plant-Fusion Lean Vanilla Bean Weight Loss (Non-GMO) got 3 stars for purity.

Wilderness Poets Homestead Stables and Superfoods Hemp Protein got 3 stars for purity.

Aloha Organic Plant-Based Protein Banana and Mixed Berry flavors got 2 stars for purity. Their Chocolate got 1 star.

Nature’s Plus Spiru-Tein Chocolate, Vanilla and Strawberry all got 2 stars for purity.

Metagenics UltraMeal got 2 stars for purity.

Orgain, a major plant-based protein brand sold at Whole Foods, Costco, etc. was surprisingly absent from the testing. However, their Healthy Kids Organic Nutritional Shakes was included in a series of baby food and formula tests and scored 4 stars for purity.

What about Whey, Egg or Bone Broth protein powders?

Even though some animal derived protein powders were found to be lower in contaminants than the plant-based protein powders, I wouldn’t touch the stuff. Animal-based protein powders are highly processed, unnatural, and elevate levels of cancer-promoting hormones, methionine and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) in the body.

Most people are not protein deficient and do not need protein powder.

Repeat. Most people are NOT protein deficient and DO NOT need protein powder. Despite what we’ve been told all our lives, we don’t need “more protein”. You can get all the protein you need (roughly 50 grams per day) from an organic whole foods plant-based diet, rich in fruits and vegetables, starches like oats, potatoes, beans, peas and lentils, as well as nuts and seeds.

To learn more about the author of this article and his awesome work with cancer click HERE. Chris overcame cancer without radiation and chemo and shares so much great info on his website, check it out when you get a chance.

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